Saturday, 16 April 2016

Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 8.0 vs Apple iPad Mini vs Google Nexus 7:Best performer is........................

Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 8.0                                                                                                                     The Galaxy Tab 3 8.0 is yet another strong tablet from Samsung and a great alternative to the Galaxy Note 8.0.The Samsung Galaxy Tab 3's light, comfortable design, myriad useful features, and bright colorful screen makes the 8-incher one of the best small tablets on the market. The Galaxy tab 3 series weighs only 314 grams and is small enough to fit in a single hand. Samsung has opted for the same 1,280 x 800 resolution screen found in the Galaxy Note 8.0, the screen also manages the same 189ppi as the Note 8.0 matching clarity levels of the S Pen-toting device. The screen is not bad. Colours are good, it's very bright and the contrast is good enough to enjoy HD videos.The Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 8.0 boasts a 5 MP camera on the back as well as a 1.3 MP on the front. The 5 MP on the back is capable of recording 720p videos and the image quality is superb for a tablet. The attached picture will give a brief glimpse of the capabilities of the camera. It boasts a battery with a capacity of 4,450 mAh, an average battery capacity for a 8 inch tablet. Battery capacity is the most accurate indicator of actual battery life. The tablet comes with a 8.0-inch display with a resolution of 1200 pixels by 800 pixels. The Samsung Galaxy Tab3 is powered by 1.5GHz dual-core and it comes with 1.5GB of RAM. The tablet packs 32GB of internal storage that can be expanded up to 64GB via a microSD card. As far as the cameras are concerned, the Samsung Galaxy Tab3 packs a 5-megapixel primary camera on the rear and a 1.3-megapixel front shooter for selfies. The Samsung Galaxy Tab3 runs Android 4.2 and is powered by a 4450mAh non removable battery. It measures 123.00 x 209.00 x 7.40 (height x width x thickness) and weighs 314.00 grams. The Samsung Galaxy Tab3  is a single SIM (GSM) tablet that accepts a Micro-SIM. Connectivity options include Wi-Fi, GPS, Bluetooth. Sensors on the tablet include Proximity sensor, Ambient light sensor, Accelerometer.  The Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 8.0 will last for almost dead-on nine hours. That’s good performance for a small tablet.                                 The Tab 3 8.0 is also priced between the $30 more expensive iPad mini.A price of $300 is a lot for any small tablet, and some features like Smart Stay and Watch On’s search don’t work as well as intended.
THE BOTTOM LINE The Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 8.0 is an excellent Android tablet that can multitask and serve as a universal remote, but it doesn't quite stand out. It costs a bit more than we'd like, but the Galaxy Tab 3 is Samsung’s best non-Note tablet yet.                                                                                         Price:$299
VS                                                                                                                                                         Apple iPad Mini                                                                                                                                           The iPad Mini's ultrathin and light design is far more intimate and booklike than the larger iPad, and its cameras, storage capacities, optional LTE antenna, and general functionality offer a full iPad experience. The screen's dimensions elegantly display larger-format magazines and apps.                                                       Another similarity with the iPad 2 is the processor. The A5 chip is getting a bit old, but our benchmark results show it can still rub shoulders with the current crop of 7in tablets. Importantly - and this is something benchmarks often fail to reflect - the iPad mini feels snappy in use, whether loading apps, scrolling around maps or browsing the web.
In the SunSpider JavaScript test, the iPad mini scored 1442ms, which puts it towards the head of the pack, but in the synthetic Geekbench 2, it managed only 752 - not a great score compared to the Nexus 7 (1452) and even the Kindle Fire HD (1124). For gaming, it's still pretty good, managing 24fps in GLBenchmark 2.5.1. The Kindle Fire HD could muster only 8.2fps here, and the Nexus 7 just 14fps. It shows that, when it comes to more demanding games, the iPad mini leads the way.
Battery life:
In terms of battery life, we found the mini didn't quite live up to Apple's 10-hour claim. Running our usual video-looping test, we recorded just 7 hours and 21 minutes with Wi-Fi turned on. That was at maximum screen brightness, however, so at a lower brightness, you might just reach 10 hours.
But, The iPad Mini costs too much, especially considering the lower resolution of its 7.9-inch non-Retina Display. The A5 processor isn't as robust as the one in the fourth-gen iPad and iPhone 5. Typing on the smaller screen is not quite as comfy.
The bottom line: If you want the full, polished Apple tablet experience in a smaller package, the iPad Mini is worth the premium price. Otherwise, good alternatives are available for less money.                                                                                                                                                                                                       Specifications
Display type7.9 inTFT active matrix - LED backlight - Yes
OSApple iOS
ProcessorApple A5
Wireless connectivityBluetooth 4.0
Dimensions (WxDxH)5.3 in x 0.28 in x 7.87 in
Weight0.68 lbs                                                                                                                                             Price;$329.00                                                                                                                                             VS                                                                                                                                                           Google Nexus 7                                                                                                                                         The Google Nexus 7 was, for a long time, the ultimate compact tablet. With an attractive price, great build and speedy software updates direct from Google, it was the pure Android experience many craved so dearly.The Nexus 7 features a sharp screen, a comfortable design, and great battery life at a low starting price.It’s slicker, faster and sleeker than any other 7-inch tablet on the market right now, and only the rear facing camera really lets it down.The battery life is really impressive, and the sheer diversity on offer, be it through the uprated CPU, screen, or GPU, mean that we struggled to put it down at times. Android 4.2 adds some welcome and useful features.
But, Android still needs more tablet-optimized apps, newer games have frame rate issues, and HSPA+ speeds seem particularly location-dependent.
The bottom line: With its excellent design, useful software features, and low starting price, the Nexus 7 is the cheapest way to experience the best that the Android OS has to offer.                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Specifications
Release date11/13/12
Display type7 inTFT active matrix - LED backlight
OSAndroid 4.1 Jelly Bean
RAM1 GB
Processor1300 MHzNVIDIA Tegra 3
Wireless connectivityBluetoothNFCWi-Fi
Dimensions (WxDxH)7.8 in x 0.4 in x 4.7 in
Weight12 oz                                                                                                                                               Price;$199.00 to $228.19

Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon vs HP EliteBook Folio 9470m vs Apple MacBook Air:Who is the best?

Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon                                                                                                                       It's the excellent power management,Incredibly light for a 14-inch laptop, the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon is ruggedly built, and has a better keyboard than any ultrabook-style laptop, even Apple's MacBook Air.
Despite packing a middle-of-the-road Intel Core i5 processor, the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon stormed our benchmark tests. The score of 9601 in our Cinebench test puts it on par with many Intel Core i7 laptops we've seen, which shows that Lenovo has chosen the very best chip on offer.
In real terms this means that any modern program is fair game for the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon, and you could multitask even the most demanding software - be it bespoke business packages or classic applications such as Photoshop or Microsoft Office.Graphics capability isn't so hot, since the responsibility for 3D is left to the onboard Intel HD 4000 core, which is built into the processor.
Onboard graphics aren't as woeful as they used to be, and there's plenty enough power to keep Windows fast and responsive, and enable picture and video editing, but if you're working professionally with HD video rendering, or looking to play the odd game in your spare time, the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon will come up short. If there's one triumph of the Lenovo X1 Carbon, it's the excellent power management, which comes via some nifty Lenovo technology. We turned the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon up to maximum performance and looped HD video to kill the battery within a respectable 164 minutes.
However, if you use the built-in software, accessible via the taskbar, you can dynamically alter the power usage to achieve around six hours of use. This is predominantly achieved by dimming the ferociously bright LED display, which makes a huge difference in the Ultrabook's stamina.                                                   But, For such an expensive laptop, battery life is just so-so.Battery Eater: 164 mins. Consumer-friendly options such as HDMI are missing.
The bottom line: The business-oriented Lenovo ThinkPad X1 has a few quirks, but is otherwise a very impressive business-oriented ultrabook with strong crossover potential.
System configurations:                                                                                                                                 Windows 8 (64-bit) w/ SP1; 1.8GHz Intel Core i5-3427U; 4GB DDR3 SDRAM 1,600MHz; 32MB (Dedicated) Intel HD 4000; 180GB Intel SSD                                                                                             Specifications
Processor3rd Gen Core i5 1.8 GHzIntel i5-3427U ( 2.8 GHz ) ( Dual-Core )
Memory4 GB/ 4 GB (max)
Hard Drive128 GB- Serial ATA-600
Operating SystemMicrosoft Windows 7 Professional
Display Type14 in
Max Resolution1600 x 900 ( HD+ )
Graphics ProcessorIntel HD Graphics 4000
Optical DriveNone                                                                                                                                    Price;$1,424.05 to $1,684.00                                                                                                                      VS                                                                                                                                                          HP EliteBook Folio 9470m                                                                                                                       The HP Elitebook 9470m has a solid, lightweight design, great battery life, and lots of ports and security features.Its 1366x768-pixel resolution just doesn't seem like its good enough for a 14in model. We would have liked an HD panel in this laptop for the price (or at least a 1600x900 panel), and also a panel with better vertical viewing angles. The screen is quite bright though and we love the matte finish, which means that reflections won't be irritating while using it with light sources behind you.The battery life of HP Elitebook 9470m "up to 9 hours and 30 minutes.
But, There's no touch screen, it has a non-high-res display, and there's a general lack of unique features to justify its high price.
The bottom line: The HP Elitebook Folio 9470m does a serviceable job at being a good thin all-around Windows 8 business laptop, but it doesn’t rise from the pack, and it doesn’t take any chances.
System configurations:                                                                                                                               Windows 8 Pro (64-bit); 1.8GHz Intel Core i5-3427U; 4GB DDR3 SDRAM 1,600MHz; 32MB (Dedicated) Intel HD 4000; 180GB Intel SSD                                                                                             Specifications
Processor3rd Gen Core i5Intel i5-3427U / 1.8 GHz ( 2.8 GHz ) ( Dual-Core )
Memory4 GB / 16 GB (max)
Hard Drive180 GB - Serial ATA-600
Operating SystemWindows 8 Pro / 7 Professional 64-bit Edition downgrade
Display Type14 in
Max Resolution1366 x 768 ( HD )
Graphics ProcessorIntel HD Graphics 4000
Weight3.6 lbs                                                                                                                                             Price;$1,224.90 to $1,356.75                                                                                                                     VS                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Apple MacBook Air                                                                                                                                   The MacBook Air has been known for its good battery life.New Intel fourth-gen CPUs help the updated MacBook Air achieve amazing battery life. The multitouch trackpad is still the industry's best, and even better, the 13-inch MacBook Air now starts at $100 less than the previous model.                                                                                                                                                  
Performance:
The new Haswell processors use very little power, giving the 2013 13-inch MacBook Air and absolutely stunning battery life. In our test, in which we streamed the live BBC News channel feed on iPlayer over a wireless network, the laptop lasted for nine hours. That's significantly better than the 11-inch MacBook Air's 7 hours 15 minutes, and a substantial improvement over the 2012 MacBook Air's 5.5 hours.
Since switching to solid state storage off the shelf with the late 2010 update, the MacBook Air has been known for its good battery life. But with the Haswell processors in place, it's absolutely stunning. At last, you can use your notebook all day long on a single charge.
But, Newer features such as touch screens and higher-resolution displays are still missing. The ultrabook competition is catching up, in terms of design.
The bottom line: Apple keeps the latest MacBook Air updates on the inside, but greatly improved battery life and a lower starting price make up for a lack of flashy design changes.                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Specifications
Release date06/10/13
ProcessorIntelCore i5 1.3 GHz ( 2.6 GHz ) ( Dual-Core )
RAM installed size4 GB
Hard Drive128 GB
Operating SystemApple OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion
Display Type13.3 in
Max Resolution1440 x 900 ( WXGA+ )
Graphics ProcessorIntel HD Graphics 5000 Dynamic Video Memory Technology 5.0
Optical DriveNone                                                                                                                                      Price $1,099

Wednesday, 13 April 2016

iPad Pro vs Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 vs iPad Air 2:Most favorite is...........................

Apple iPad Pro                                                                                                                                           The iPad Pro is a much bigger device than the average tablet – with a 12.9-inch display, it's always going to be a bit hefty.The design language follows on strongly from the rest of the iPad family, with the same ceramic-like metal on the back, the curved edges and TouchID home button above the Lightning port.The new iPad Pro is the biggest and fastest Apple tablet to date. The pressure-sensitive Pencil stylus offers superior sketching and drawing, and the Pro's gorgeous giant screen and quad speakers are ideal for split-screen apps, multitasking and watching movies.                                                                                    PERFORMANCE:                                                                                                                                    In terms of the engine Apple's stuck inside the iPad Pro, the company has gone all out here. The Pro features an A9X chip inside, coupled with 4GB of RAM (according to Geekbench, although Apple hasn't confirmed this).
This makes the iPad Pro easily the most powerful non-Mac device Apple's ever made by some distance. What that means in real life is two fold: you can execute multiple apps at once without a hint of slowdown, with heavy titles like Adobe Photoshop working in an instant and the ability to do many things at once a really slick experience.
The Split Screen mode of iOS 9, introduced in June at WWDC 2015, seemed like an odd thing - the 9.7-inch size of the iPad Air sort of made sense with two apps running at the same time, but now we've got this whopping screen to play with it makes a lot more sense.
If we're talking raw numbers, and I know that's why some of you cheeky people are here, then you're in for a treat. Using Geekbench 3 to test, the iPad Pro scores 5472, which is well ahead of the 4506 from the iPad Air 2 and the 4974 of the next-most powerful device, the Galaxy Note 5.                                                     That won't mean much in day to day use, but it gives the iPad Pro a massive boost in terms of future proofing it. The apps to come are going to make more and more of that impressive chipset running at the heart of the tablet, and having the raw grunt to keep up will mean that you're going to keep getting a decent performance for years to come.
The interface is nothing special though - I don't mean that critically, as the simplicity of iOS is something that's one of the selling points of Apple's devices. However, some people looking at the iPad Pro as a dedicated professional device will be a little disappointed as it still runs the same way as the iPad Air 2, albeit with a lot of accessories to play around with.   The same grid of apps prevails, with the notifications shade above and the Control Center below for easy access to messages and commonly used actions.
The larger screen means you need to move your hand further to achieve these, but it's not like you're being asked to throw yourself over a waterfall in a barrel, just moving your finger a little further up and down.
However, it's worth noting as it is one of the drawbacks of having a larger device like this, and you'll need to be aware of them before puchase.                                                                                                             But,At launch, very few apps are currently optimized to take advantage of the iPad Pro's full potential. Its large size makes it less portable than other iPads. Once you've paid for the Pencil and keyboard peripherals, the iPad Pro costs as much as a good laptop, but lacks its flexibility.
The Bottom Line The iPad Pro is a dream machine for graphic designers and media mavens, but this elegant tablet needs more optimized apps and accessories before it can fully achieve laptop-killer status.
Key Features: 12.9-inch 2048 x 2732 screen; A9X 2.26GHz dual-core processor ; 4GB RAM; 8 megapixel rear camera; 1.2-megapixel FaceTime camera; 4 stereo speakers; iOS 9
Manufacturer: Apple


Price:$799                                                                                                                                                   VS                                                                                                                                                             Samsung Galaxy Tab S2                                                                                                                         High-end Android tablets are becoming few and far between, indicating to us that the tablet segment in general has been seeing a slowdown. Most consumers seem to be more gravitated to either picking up a low-cost laptop hybrid, or the many inexpensive tablets that pack reasonable value for the money. On that note, it’s no surprise to us that many companies have stopped production and development for high-end tablets on the Android side. And then there’s Samsung!                                                                             The Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 has bright and vividly colorful screen. Its rail-thin design is comfortable and ultracompact. It comes with 32GB of storage, a microSD card expansion slot and fingerprint scanner. Battery life is long.
Unlike previous models, there's no IR blaster.                                                                                             Design:

The Galaxy Tab S2 feels nicer to hold in two hands than the Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 and its sibling, the Galaxy Tab 8.4. In fact, it's now light enough to comfortably clutch in one hand. Design

The Galaxy Tab S2 feels nicer to hold in two hands than the Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 and its sibling, the Galaxy Tab 8.4. In fact, it's now light enough to comfortably clutch in one hand.
The Samsung Tab S2 is lighter in part because it's backed by a soft-touch plastic cover instead of an aluminium shell. Metal edges outline the tablet instead of a plastic frame this time.
The entire device may not be metal, but it does feel smooth. It's better than the dimpled plastic of the Samsung Galaxy Tab S, yet remains just as grippy.
Two small, springy buttons are embedded into the back of the Tab S2, but they're meant for clipping a cover onto the tablet and aren't releases to pop off the back. It's all sealed shut.
There is, however, a microSD card slot on the frame to optionally boost the 32GB and 64GB configurations with an additional 128GB of expandable storage.
Alongside this same rail are a solid-feeling power button and volume rocker. Stereo speakers, a headphone jack and an off-center micro USB port line the bottom of the tablet.
The Tab S2 has a physical, fingerprint-sensing home button in front with the usual oval shape, and two capacitive buttons on either side. These keys light up by default every time the display is touched.
The beams of light are a bit distracting when scrolling and reading text near the bottom of the screen, and turning them off in settings doesn't help orient your fingers in the dark. This wider tablet isn't like a narrower phone, where you know the exact location of these keys.
The latest Galaxy Tab comes in three colors: Black, White and Gold. Gone are the fancy names like Dazzling White and Titanium Bronze, reflecting Samsung's minimalist design with this year's ultra-thin tablet.               Display:

A tablet is all about the display and we've seen some unusual flip-flopping in resolutions over the past few years. With the 2012 Nexus 10 (which is made by Samsung) plopping out a 2560 x 1600 pixel display and the original Samsung Galaxy Tab S following suit, the Tab S2 now steps down to 2048 x 1536 pixels (264ppi density).That's the same resolution as we saw on the 2014 Nexus 9 tablet and it's the same as the iPad Air 2, which is the exact same size at 9.7-inches too. The shift from higher resolutions might be partly due to the shift in aspect ratio from 16:9 (or 16:10) to 4:3, or it could simply be that the returns for that resolution weren't hugely apparent.                                                                                                           However, the Tab S2 is equipped with an AMOLED display whereas most competitors offer LCD. Samsung is known for AMOLED and has enjoyed great results on its Galaxy smartphones and Note tablets with this technology. On the Tab S2, you're again rewarded with great contrast, lots of punch in visuals, and deep, rich colours that are typical of such a panel.                                                                                         You might notice that the richness makes some content look a little dark so you have to bump up the brightness to get best out of movies and videos. We found the colours a little overwrought in the opening scenes when watching Mockingjay, for example, but the deep blacks and brilliant blues set up Gravity nicely. On the flipside, some games are incredibly rich, making us wish we could dial it down a little for a more natural view.                                                                                                                                          AMOLED can also struggle to produce clean and bright whites as a result, something that Samsung has worked hard to improve on recent devices - but there's a hint of cool blue white here.                                   The thing you will notice, however, is that on this size of display some of Android's apps don't scale as well as they should. You'll find softness becomes apparent in some games, for example, or some of the graphic elements in apps don't look as sharp as they do on your smartphone, phablet or smaller tablet. Take Real Racing 3 as an example: it looks blocky, so visually it's not as pleasant as on smaller or even 16:9 tablets with less display height. If that's a factor for you, the smaller 8-inch Tab S2 model might be the better choice. The display aspect also means the Tab S2 works a little better in portrait orientation than 16:9 devices, making for a better reading experience, whether that's on the included Flipboard-based Briefing newsreader, or when using something like the Kindle app. On the flip side, you'll have a lot of empty space top and bottom when watching movies in landscape - especially if they are shot in the cinematic 21:9 aspect ratio.
 Hardware
The Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 houses an octa-core Exynos 5433 chipset, comprised of a 1.9GHz and 1.3GHz quad-core CPU. It also has 32GB of internal storage and a microSD card expansion slot that's expandable up to 128GB. The Samsung website lists a 64GB version, but only the 32GB model is available for purchase; Samsung hasn't released details on when and if the 64GB one be available.
Other features include Bluetooth 4.1 with low-energy function (BLE) and Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac MIMO -- which is faster than regular Wi-Fi.
SOFTWARE

The Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 runs the latest version of Android with the scaled-down version of TouchWiz. It's a similar software experience to what we see on the Note 5 and latest Galaxy S6 devices.
There are not too many apps loaded out of the box, but since this is an AT&T LTE model you get plenty of bloatware from this US carrier. AT&T apps include myAT&T, AT&T AllAccess, AT&T Locker, Device Help, AT&T FamilyMap, AT&T Ready2Go, YP, WildTangent Games, and AT&T Messages. Given the recent DIRECTV deal, you will also find a DIRECTV app installed on the Tab S2.
Samsung apps include Galaxy Apps, Hancom Office Viewer, Memo, Samsung Milk Music, SideSync, and Smart Manager. You will also find several Google apps, but these have been reduced by Google so loading up your preferred Google apps is up to your own preferences in many cases.
One of the reasons to pick up a Samsung tablet is to be able to use a couple apps at the same time in a side-by-side format. As you can see in a couple of screenshots in my gallery, many apps look absolutely terrible in this format and neither app ends up being useful.


The Samsung Galaxy Tab S2's brilliant screen, plentiful storage capacity and slender build make it a great tablet for everyday use at home or on the go.                                                                                                Price ;$347.99                                            
vs                                                                                                                                                                  iPad Air 2

It's even thinner and lighter than last time around and to a noticeable extent. The screen is better, with more vibrant colours, it's more powerful thanks to its A8X processor and the battery life holds up just as well. It even benefits from Touch ID and Apple Pay and while these features aren't as exciting here as they are on phones they're still nice to have. Performance
The 64-bit A7 processor introduced on the iPhone 5S was altered to provide a power boost to last year’s iPad Air. Called the A7X this chip was similar in performance to the A7 – up 5-10% in our benchmark tests.
This year Apple has gone further and designed a processor specifically for the iPad Air 2. The A8X has a tri-core CPU running at 1.5GHz and a quad-core graphics processing unit coupled, for the first time, to 2GB of RAM.
If we play Specs Top Trumps the iPad Air 2 looks a shadow of top-end Android tablets such as the Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5 and its 2.3GHz quad-core processor. Don’t let that fool you, though. The iPad Air 2 is the most powerful tablet we’ve ever tested – and that’s including Nvidia’s Shield Tablet that packs the great new Tegra K1.
And while the processor is key to that performance, Apple has also ensured that iOS 8 can make the most of it. Metal lets developers take full advantage of the quad-core GPU, while the new iOS programming language, Swift, means apps can hook into certain features such as Touch ID.
Some observers have even compared the iPad Air 2's performance to a desktop PC. In some respects they’re right. The A8X processor performs a few tasks faster than PCs just a few years old, but the question is: do you need all that power? If you intend to use your iPad as a productivity device then you’ll appreciate it. Even if you don’t, you may find yourself using it more as a laptop replacement than you anticipated.
During the launch of the Air 2, Apple showed off a video-editing app called Replay that lets you create slick-looking videos with ease. The iPad Air 2 powered through the edits.
There are clear benefits to be had from the extra performance, but let’s see how it stacks up against the competition.
The iPad Air 2 scores an excellent 4,509 on Geekbench 3. To put that in some context, the next fastest tablet we’ve reviewed, the Nvidia Shield, scored 3220 – that’s 40% faster. That also makes the iPad Air 2 almost 70% faster than the iPad Air. That’s some impressive work in just a year.
And the wins keep coming with a 3D Mark Ice Storm Unlimited score of 21,797. That’s 33% higher than the Shield and almost 50% better than the first-generation iPad Air.
The iPad Air 2 is astonishingly fast – so fast, in fact, that you might not know what to do with all that power. Not that we’re complaining, of course. The extra grunt means that this is a tablet you can use for more than just checking out the latest memes and Facebook. It future-proofs the Air 2 to some degree.
There’s also been an upgrade to the co-processor, now called the M8. This handles all the sensor data from the iPad Air 2, such as the accelerometer and the new barometer. The reason that Apple favours a co-processor is that it uses much less power than the main processor, helping the battery to last longer.

In short the iPad Air 2 really is the complete package and while you can always find things to niggle about there are no significant flaws.                                                                                                                       In the time since the original iPad Air launched everything else is still struggling to match it and yet Apple has managed to raise the benchmark higher still. Everyone else really has their work cut out if the iPad Air 2 is going to be unseated from the number one spot. The new iPad Air gets an improved A8X processor, better rear and front-facing cameras, an even thinner and lighter design, an anti-reflective screen, a Touch ID fingerprint sensor, and more built-in storage at higher configurations than last year.                                         But The Air 2 isn't a big change from last year's iPad in terms of overall function; battery life remains the same, although its battery life is already pretty good. Audio playback via speakers makes the thin metal body resonate more than before.                                                                                                                         The Bottom Line The iPad Air 2 is a nice refinement and finesse of last year's model, with a bevy of tweaks, enhancements, a much faster processor, and the welcome addition of Touch ID. Simply put: it's still the gold standard for tablets.
Weight: 437g | Dimensions: 240 x 169.5 x 6.1mm | OS: iOS 8.1 | Screen size: 9.7-inch | Resolution: 1536 x 2048 | CPU: Triple-core 1.5 GHz | RAM: 2GB | Storage: 16/64/128GB | Battery: 7340mAh | Rear camera: 8MP | Front camera: 1.2MP                                                                                                                     $349.95

Tuesday, 12 April 2016

Samsung ATIV Smart PC Pro vs Microsoft Surface Pro vs Lenovo IdeaTab Lynx:Which one is better?

Samsung ATIV Smart PC Pro 700T                                                                                                           Samsung’s ATIV Smart PC Pro 700T hybrid is a fast, full-powered Core i5 tablet, has a 1080p screen, comes with its own keyboard base, and includes the pressure-sensitive S-Pen that’s very accurate and responsive.The ATIV Smart PC Pro 700T may not offer the selection of ports and connections you'd expect on a full-fledged laptop, but it's par for the course for detachable tablets. It's equipped with one full-size USB 3.0 port, a headset jack, a microSD card slot, and micro HDMI port.The inclusion of an S-Pen and keyboard dock help make the Core i5-powered Samsung ATIV Smart PC Pro 700T a formidable multitasking tablet.The Samsung's 4 cell Lithium Ion polymer battery puts in a relatively good showing here and we averaged 5.5 to 6 hours of actual use time on a charge with WiFi on and brightness set to 50% with auto-brightness turned on. That's about an hour better than Surface Pro but an hour short of the Acer W700.
But, Battery life isn’t great for a tablet; it lacks laptop-style features like Ethernet and a standard SD card slot; plus, it’s even more expensive than the Surface Pro.
The bottom line: The Samsung ATIV Smart PC Pro 700T walks the line between ultrabook-level laptop and tablet, but doesn’t truly excel at either.                                                                                                        Specifications
Processor3rd Gen Core i5Intel i5-3317U / 1.7 GHz ( Dual-Core )
Memory4 GB / 4 GB (max)
Hard Drive128 GB - Serial ATA-300
Operating SystemWindows 8 64-bit Edition
Display Type11.6 in
Max Resolution1920 x 1080 ( Full HD )
Graphics ProcessorIntel HD Graphics 4000 Dynamic Video Memory Technology
Optical DriveNone                                                                                                                                    Price;$1,179.00 to $1,231.98                                                                                                                                                                                     VS                                                                                       Microsoft Surface Pro                                                                                                                               Making your mind up about the Surface Pro is less about what it is and what it does and more about what you want out of a tablet. As a hybrid PC it's an undeniable compromise - but that's no bad thing.The Microsoft Surface Pro fits a full ultrabook experience in a compact 10-inch tablet. Thanks to the ingenious Type and Touch covers, it offers a comfortable interface and typing experience. The clean, crisp design and sharp 1080p screen rise above the competition.
But, The battery life is disappointing, and more ports would be nice. The 64GB model barely has any free storage. It costs as much as a regular laptop, especially because the cool keyboard cover isn't included by default.
The bottom line: The Surface Pro's gutsy design successfully reinvents the Windows 8 laptop by cramming an ultrabook experience into the body of a 10-inch tablet. Those wanting to go all-in on the tablet experience won't regret buying the Surface Pro, but we're holding out for a future, more polished generation of the device.
Windows 8 Pro (64-bit); 1.7GHz IntelCore i5; 4GB DDR3 SDRAM 1,600MHz; 32MB (Sharedl) Intel HD 4000; 128GB Micron SSD                                                                                                         Specifications
Release date02/9/13
Display type10.6 inColor TFT active matrix - Yes
OSMicrosoft Windows 8 Pro
RAM4 GB
Processor3rd Gen Core i5Intel
Wireless connectivityIEEE 802.11nIEEE 802.11bIEEE 802.11aIEEE 802.11g
Dimensions (WxDxH)0.53 in10.8 in 6.8 in
Weight903 g                                                                                                                                               Price;$899.99                                                                                                                                                                                                                       VS                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Lenovo IdeaTab Lynx                                                                                                                           The IdeaTab Lynx is well-balanced when plugged into its keyboard base, and offers good battery life, and a bigger-screen alternative to Lenovo's other Atom tablet.                                                                      Performance and Battery Life:                                                                                                                     The Lynx feels smooth and responsive when using its touch screen controls, but the main disadvantage of the Atom processor is that it supports a maximum of 2GB of memory.The Lynx might struggle with more demanding tasks, due to the processor and RAM, so it isn’t quite a replacement for a conventional laptop for serious work. Don’t expect to edit and render HD video in record time, for example.It’s a little light on storage too – almost 27GB of the 64GB solid-state storage is taken up by Windows itself, which only leaves you about 37GB for your own files. Fortunately, there’s a micro-SD slot that will allow you to add another 32GB storage if you need to.
The Atom processor also relies on the old Intel GMA integrated graphics, which means that your gaming activity will probably be restricted to casual games such as Angry Birds.The tablet gives you up to 8 hours battery life but you can double it to 16 hours when you connect it with the optional keyboard dock.
But, The keyboard has too much flex, and the docking hinge sticks. For only a little more, better products are available.
The bottom line: The IdeaTab Lynx is a perfectly functional Windows 8 hybrid but lacks the lower price of some competitors, or better design and features of others.
System configurations                                                                                                                                 Windows 8 (32-bit); 1.8GHz Intel Atom Z2760; 2GB DDR2 SDRAM 800MHz; 737MB (Total) Intel GMA; 64GB MMC SSD                                                                                                               Specifications
ProcessorIntel AtomZ2760 / 1.8 GHz ( Dual-Core )
Memory2 GB / 2 GB (max)
Operating SystemMicrosoft Windows 8
Display Type11.6 in IPS
Max Resolution1366 x 768 ( HD )
Graphics ProcessorPowerVR SGX545
Optical DriveNone
Weight22.6 oz                                                                                                                                              Price:$649.00

Microsoft Surface Pro 3 vs Dell Venue 11 Pro:Most favorite is........................

Microsoft Surface Pro 3                                                                                                                          Microsoft might not be the first company to break into 2-in-1 laptop, but it's one of the few to get it right. The first Surface was a suave new device that worked both as a laptop and tablet. Thanks to an ergonomic kickstand and excellent magnetic keyboard, it easy to use whether you're at a desk or even laying down. The Surface Pro 3 is thinner and lighter than the previous two versions, despite having a larger 12-inch display and higher screen resolution. A new kickstand makes it easier to set up and use, and the keyboard cover remains a best-in-class example. The Surface Pro 3 is now optimized for a digital pen, which is included.       Performance                                                                                                                                            Despite its remarkably slim and light frame, the Surface Pro 3 is a powerful machine. In benchmarks it's a match for pricey ultrabooks like the Toshiba Kira. Its 1.9GHz Core i5 processor scores 5,532, more than Toshiba (5,424) and the 2014 MacBook Air (5,401).
The MacBook and Surface Pro make an interesting comparison here. Apple favours a slower processor, but a faster PCI-e SSD and Intel's faster HD 5000 graphics. It's a trade-off that makes the MacBook very snappy, but the Surface Pro 3 is no slouch either.
That faster processor gives it an edge in processor intensive tasks, too. This is no workstation class processor, of course, but anything you can throw at an ultrabook works fine on the Surface Pro 3. That means any task or application you use in everyday work and life. It's an efficient and effective replacement for a work laptop or ageing desktop.
It isn't noisy, either. If you're just watching video or doing some other simple task, it's rare to even hear the fan spin up. Even when it does it's an unobtrusive whir. You'll notice it in quiet surroundings, but it's barely discernible over the hubbub of an office. It's another reminder of the incredible industrial design in the Surface Pro 3.
But That excellent keyboard cover is not included in the base price, and its improved touchpad still doesn't measure up. The chassis lacks pen storage, and even with tweaked kickstand and keyboard hinges, the Surface Pro 3 still doesn't fit perfectly on the lap.                                                                                     The Bottom Line While the new Surface Pro 3 is Microsoft's best PC to date, it's more successful as a tablet than a laptop replacement.                                                                                                                              CPU: 1.9GHz Intel Core i5-4300U | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 4400 | RAM: 8GB | Screen: 12-inch, 2160 x 1440 multi-touch display| Storage: 256GB SSD                                                                             $649.99                                                                                                                                                   VS                                                                                                                                                                Dell Venue 11 Pro                                                                                                                                       Dell's Venue 11 Pro is one tablet that works in three different ways. You can use it as a typical Windows 8.1 tablet, snap it into a keyboard dock and use it like a laptop, or remotely connect it to a dock hooked up to a monitor or TV to play movies and TV shows on a larger screen.Dell says it has "The power of an Ultrabook, performance of a desktop, portability of a tablet."The Venue 11 Pro is unmatched for practicality. There's a mini-HDMI output; a 3.5mm headset jack; a full-sized USB 3 port; a volume rocker switch; and a Kensington lock slot.The rear panel pops off to allow access to the 32Wh battery, and in a welcome change from its predecessor, the Latitude 10, the Venue 11 Pro charges via micro-USB.The Venue 11 Pro10.8-inch a Full HD (1,920 x 1,080) IPS display and will be offered with Intel's Atom quad-core Bay Trail processors or a fourth-generation Haswell processor up to Core i5 -- supporting up to 8GB RAM, 256GB of storage, WiDi and NFC.With the big screen and quad-core processor you’ll get around eight hours of mixed use from a single charge, and a little more if you turn down the brightness and avoid using Wi-Fi. That’s better than the Surface Pro 2, though not the ARM-powered Surface 2. Eight to nine hours is more than adequate for a day of work, and the Venue 11 Pro has one advantage in that you can remove the back cover and replace the battery with a spare – a real rarity in the tablet world.One thing that sets the Venue 11 Pro apart, however, is that the back cover can flip off, revealing a removable battery. Both versions of the tablet are pen-enabled, and each includes an 8-megapixel back camera. Accessories include a $99 dock that allows you to push the tablet's display to a larger monitor, a keyboard with a back stand, and a full keyboard dock with USB ports.Price:$500.

Razer Blade QHD+ vs Microsoft Surface Book:Who is the best?

Razer Blade QHD+                                                                                                                                     The Razer Blade has been one of the best slim gaming laptops for a while, The Razer Blade is an impressive laptop thanks to its gorgeous display, responsive keyboard and touchpad, successful combination of power and portability and excellent gaming performance for its size. This impressive display helps make the Blade a well rounded package with solid build quality, excellent speakers, stellar trackpad and a decent keyboard.  It looks good, too. 14.0-inches QHD+ 16:9 Ratio, 3200x1800, with LED backlight, capacitive multi-touch panel viewing better edges on touchscreen on windows 8.1. Intel Core i7-4702HQ Quad Core Processor with Hyper Threading 2.2GHz / 3.2GHz (Base/Turbo), Nvidia’s latest GTX-870M Graphic Processor Unit (GPU), NVIDIA® GeForce GTX 870M (3 GB GDDR5 VRAM, Optimus Technology), 8 GB DDR3 RAM onboard, 128 GB SSD for storage i think not enough for professional users, Wi-Fi 802.11ac, HDMI, USB 3.0 ports(Three). Built-in HD webcam 2.0Mega-Pixel. The Backlit anti-ghosting keyboard allows you to see the keys in dark. The green and white metal chassis is just 0.7-inches thick and about it is 2 kilograms heavy. Play all latest games on Razer Blade like Wolfenstein, COD, Splinter Cell latest, Need 4 Speed and many others.
but,The biggest issue you'll run into using this laptop is the lack of support for such a high-resolution screen. It comes with the territory, but the bottom back of the Blade can get very hot, and the fans can get quite loud trying to cool it down. This kind of performance in a thin-and-light body doesn't come cheap.
THE BOTTOM LINE A QHD+ monitor simply doesn't make much sense on a gaming laptop … yet. It's absolutely lovely to gawk at for your daily driver, as I've experienced handling the Dell XPS 13 or Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro. However, modern mobile GPUs are just not powerful enough (yes, still) to drive the 3,200 x 1,800 pixel count. Whether it's for gaming, multimedia enjoyment, work or all of the above, the Razer Blade is a fantastic choice if you need high performance but don't want to sacrifice mobility to get it.                         Price:$2099

 VS                                                                                                                                                       Microsoft Surface Book                                                                                                                             The Microsoft Surface Book packs high-end components, including new Intel processors and optional Nvidia graphics, into a smart, slim body. Some components and most of the battery are hidden in the base, so the tablet half is lighter. The high-res screen looks great, and the included stylus pen is excellent.             The Surface Book has 13.5-inch display offers 3,000 x 2,000 resolution for 267ppi. Microsoft also uses its new PixelSense technology which essentially means a very thin, closely bonded, glass screen for super responsive touch and stylus controls. The Surface Book, also all metal, offers a detachable screen that doubles as a tablet. But this has meant a slight increase in thickness to nearly 23mm when closed. The Surface Book display offers sixth-gen Intel Core i5 and i7 chip 16GB of RAM and up to 1TB of SSD storage. While the tablet part of the Surface Book is limited to the Intel HD Graphic 520, there is a separate GPU in the keyboard section. This is an Nvidia GeForce processor with 1GB of GDDR5 memory. The Surface Book offers plenty of connectivity options that vary and may appeal to different people's needs. The Surface Book offers two USB 3.0 ports and full microSD. The MacBook features an HDMI port where the Surface Book is limited to a Mini Display Port and using a 5-megapixel front-facing camera.                                                                                                                                                                                             The Surface Book is no ordinary Surface, sporting a sleek, all-silver, magnesium design with a unique, flexible hinge designed to keep the laptop's removable display from getting too wobbly. But while Microsoft mostly knocks it out of the park with its first laptop, the device is still a bit top-heavy, and opening the lid is more difficult than we'd like.  Microsoft’s Surface Book offers SSD storage options of 128 GB/256 GB/512 GB/1 TB. It also comes with a microSD slot. The new Microsoft tablet cum laptop hybrid bears an 8 MP rear camera and a 5 MP primary camera and will run on latest Windows 10.                                                                                                                                                                                                            Microsoft is downplaying the Surface Book as a tablet by calling it "clipboard mode," but you can remove the Surface Book's screen to use as a humongous slate. This should be a big upgrade over the Surface Pro 3, as both the Surface Book and Surface Pro 4 have big glass trackpads – a lot like Apple's MacBooks.       Battery life
Battery life on the Surface Book is both pretty good and surprisingly disappointing. While Microsoft has promised 12 hours of continual usage and other outlets report getting even more juice out of the machine, our best time for the device was 7 hours and 39 minutes. As for the Clipboard on its own, the tablet can last for 4 hours.
While these are more than respectable numbers considering all the hardware inside the Surface Book, I honestly expected a much longer run time. The good news is this notebook recharges quickly, going from zero to 100% charge in under two hours.

But,Configurations with the optional Nvidia GPU and more storage get very expensive. There are some first-generation quirks, including an awkward gap between the screen and base when closed.
THE BOTTOM LINE While it's not nearly as refined as the new fourth-gen Surface Pro, Microsoft's Surface Book is a powerful, feature-filled premium hybrid that doesn't forget it's a laptop first.                      Price:$1499.00

Sunday, 10 April 2016

Microsoft Surface RT vs Sony Xperia Tablet Z vs Apple iPad 4:Who is the boss?

Microsoft Surface RT                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        The Microsoft Surface's Metro interface is innovative, elegant, powerful, and versatile. The tablet feels strong and well-built, runs Office 2013, and includes rich video and music services. Its keyboard cover accessories are the best ways to type on a tablet, period.
Performance:                                                                                                                                             A common misconception is that the traditional desktop isn't available in Windows RT, but that's not true; it's accessed via the desktop tile on the Start screen, but its relevance is severely diminished.
As Windows RT can't run traditional programs you need to use the old style Windows Explorer less, but it's still on hand for browsing file systems, USB sticks, organising folders and more.
The 'charm' bar to the right also includes search and share buttons and these are threaded through every part of the OS, from files to settings, to the information held within apps.Another triumph is the on-screen keyboard, which is large, sensitive and easy to use. It's not as smart as some third-party keyboards on Android, but we typed with two hands quickly and accurately and the extra inch of screen space made it much easier to use than its iOS counterpart.
We had a few problems with the large keyboard panel blocking information we needed, but the icon to show or hide the keyboard is always on hand in the bottom-right corner of the desktop.
As we've already mentioned, performance is a slightly mixed bag. The system is always responsive, with silky smooth transitions and snappy navigation.
However, we found that some apps were slow to load, with lingering splash screens. What's more, 1080p playback was a few frames per second short of perfect.
While we wouldn't say that the Tegra 3 chip performed appallingly, there's certainly no headroom, and it seems to be the graphics core that struggled most.
Multitasking apps never missed a beat, but it was loading the graphically-intensive apps and movies that showed the biggest strain on the processor.
Even some basic games ran at a noticeably low frame rate, so it seems that Windows RT might need some optimisation.                                                                                                                                                 Battery life:
Our experience of the battery life has bemused us somewhat. We started off a day with the Surface RT at 100 percent and only used the tablet intensely for around an hour and a half while shooting our video review. We then used the Surface RT in the evening for around 30 minutes web browsing. The next morning, however, the Surface RT needed the mains charger to switch on so the battery had full depleted overnight. Strange considering Microsoft touts 7-15 days idle life.                                                                              But, The tablet's performance can be sluggish, its Windows Store is a ghost town, Metro takes getting used to, and the Desktop interface feels clunky and useless.
The bottom line: If you're an early adopter willing to forget everything you know about navigating a computer, the Surface tablet could replace your laptop. Everyone else: wait for more apps.                                                                                                                                                                                               Specifications
Display type10.6 inColor TFT active matrix - Yes
OSMicrosoft Windows RT
RAM2 GB
ProcessorNVIDIA Tegra 3
Wireless connectivityIEEE 802.11nIEEE 802.11bIEEE 802.11aIEEE 802.11g
Dimensions (WxDxH)9.3 mm10.8 in 6.8 in
Weight676 g                                                                                                                                               Price;$494.98 to $599.00                                                                                                                          VS                                                                                                                                                              Sony Xperia Tablet Z                                                                                                                                 The Xperia is a 10.1-inch tablet and features a quad-core Qualcomm processor. This is Sony's third large-form Android tablet in two years. While the previous entry had some technical issues, the Xperia Tablet Z has the potential to be the company's best tablet yet.The Xperia Tablet Z ships with Android 4.1 (Jelly Bean) and will be upgradable to 4.2.The Xperia Tablet Z is powered by a 1.5GHz quad-core Snapdragon S4 Pro processor and includes 2GB of RAM, supports Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, MHL, NFC, a gyroscope, an accelerometer, and aGPS.The screen is scratch resistant and delivers 1,920x1,200 pixels. Text looked extremely sharp and the colors popped from the screen with a vibrancy seen only on the very best tablets.   Price;$499.00                                                                                                                                             VS                                                                                                                                                                Apple iPad 4                                                                                                                                                The newest iPad's faster A6X processor adds extra system speed and graphics power.It's clear, it's bright, it's crisp; essentially it properly expands the smartphone experience onto a larger tablet and takes us into a new generation of displays. Improved worldwide cellular compatibility makes the LTE model a more appealing proposition. And the iOS App Store remains best in class, with the widest selection.The iPad range remains among the best in class for battery life considering their size and weight, providing a genuine 10hrs use between charges and lasting for weeks in standby.Gaming tends to cause the biggest drain on battery life but you’ll still get 6-7 hours solid play from even the most demanding 3D titles.
But, The fourth-gen iPad is otherwise identical to its recent predecessor -- same size, weight, and Retina screen. It's heavy to hold in one hand, and most older accessories won't work without investing in a pricey Lightning adapter.
The bottom line: The latest iPad adds several tweaks and improvements to secure its position at the top of the tablet heap. It's better all around, but third-gen owners need not apply.                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Specifications
Display type9.7 inTFT active matrix - LED backlight - Yes
OSApple iOS
ProcessorApple A6X
Wireless connectivityIEEE 802.11nIEEE 802.11bIEEE 802.11aIEEE 802.11gBluetooth 4.0
Dimensions (WxDxH)7.31 in x 0.37 in x 9.5 in
Weight1.44 lbs                                                                                                                                           Price;$499.00 to $509.49