Saturday, 2 April 2016

iPhone 6S Plus vs LG V10 vs iPhone 6s:Who is the boss?

iPhone 6S Plus                                                                                                                                           The iPhone 6S Plus is just as big, bold, and bright as last year’s phablet. Its 5.5-inch screen sports the same number of pixels as last year’s iPhone with a 1,920 × 1,080-pixel resolution and a density of 401 pixels per inch.Improved speed, better cameras, always-on Siri, and pressure-sensitive 3D Touch display compared to last year's 6 Plus. And it has slightly better battery life, a bigger higher resolution screen, and optical image stabilization for photos and video that can make a difference.  in short: the iPhone 6S Plus is very fast. In fact, it surpasses even our previous fastest phone – the Samsung Galaxy S6 – in some of the benchmark tests. While other smartphones come with four, six or even eight CPU cores, the iPhone 6S Plus manages to deliver such performance with only two. How can it perform better than those other phones that sound so impressive on paper?
It’s because many smartphone apps use only one or two cores at a time. This means that having fewer but more powerful cores is often of greater benefit than having a bag-load of cores that aren’t quite as fast.
In addition, you shouldn’t feel the iPhone 6S is shortchanging you in terms of processors. While the CPU has only two cores, the GPU (graphics processing unit) has six. With the two combined on the A9 chipset, the 6S Plus is a powerhouse – whether you’re into gaming, photo editing or general productivity.
For security, the 6S Plus comes with Touch ID – Apple’s fingerprint scanner – built into the home button.
This makes your phone far more secure than relying on a simple PIN – in fact, iOS 9 now strongly recommends you use a six-digit PIN instead of the four-digit one iPhone users will be more accustomed to.
Touch ID also lets you use the iPhone 6S Plus with Apple Pay, so you can tap your phone on a touch-and-pay terminal to purchase good and services.
Apple Pay has been around in the US for more than a year now, but was only recently introduced to the UK and so isn't yet supported by all the banks. For example, holders of a Barclays bank account can't yet use Apple Pay.
Fingerprint scanners are by no means unique to the iPhone any more, but they’re still a great feature, making it super-easy to keep your phone secure without making unlocking a regular drudgery.
Touch ID on the iPhone 6S Plus is better than ever, thanks to the improved processor. It unlocks the phone almost twice as fast as before, giving you access to all your mobile tools even more quickly.
The final iPhone 6S Plus feature worth expanding on is something we’ve mentioned already, the new Taptic Engine.
You’ll have experienced phones vibrating when on silent before and the Taptic Engine on the iPhone 6S Plus performs a similar function, but it’s as close to those as a hamburger is to a fillet steak.
It brings a more nuanced experience to the vibrations that help you better understand what’s going on. A phone call has a different feel to a text message, for example.
It also ties into 3D Touch. Use 3D Touch on an icon that supports it and a short buzz lets you know it’s been activated. Try it on one that doesn’t support 3D Touch and you get the vibration equivalent of a head shake.

but,Apple's made the iPhone 6S Plus bigger (slightly) and heavier (considerably), meaning it's still a beast to hold and very difficult to use one handed. It's really big. It costs more than the smaller iPhone. Other phablet-sized phones offer longer battery life.
THE BOTTOM LINE :A combination of excellent power and an exciting new technology in 3D Touch means the iPhone 6S Plus is set up for the future much better than the 6 Plus. The iPhone 6S Plus has a few key advantages that give it an edge for serious iPhone users, but its big body still may not fit for a lot of people.                                                                                                                                               Price:$649                                                                                                                                                   VS                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                LG V10                                                                                                                                                     The V10 is the first (non-Nexus) LG phone with a fingerprint sensor.The new LG V10 Android smartphone has two selfie shooters and a second screen, both sitting immediately above its 5.7-inch display.The sturdily designed LG V10 gives users more camera control with manual modes for both photos and video, a fingerprint sensor, two front-facing cameras for wider selfie shots, expandable memory and a removable battery. It features a similar six-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 808 processor to the LG G4, but with 4GB of RAM so certain processes should run more smoothly. It has 64GB of internal storage, with a microSD card slot capable of expanding that by a further 200GB. The rear camera is 16-megapixels, with optical image stablisation, while the front 5-megapixel snapper has two lenses to create a winder field of view than most front cams. This was apparent when we took a selfie at the show, with the camera taking in a lot more background than most.
It can record 4K video at 30 frames per second, with a slow-mo function able to record 720p at 120fps. And it is a 4G device.
The 5.7-inch main panel is a larger version of the G4’s Quad HD display, and it’s stunning. Bring the brightness down to about 50-percent, choose a dark wallpaper with splashes of color, and revel in its gorgeousness. Play some video, and it’s even better, with strong contrast, incredibly bright colors, and lively tones. It may not be incredibly lifelike, but it just looks so good, you won’t care if it’s perhaps less natural than other screens.
The 2.1-inch second screen is an always-on mini display that I wanted to use more than I did. LG’s keen on giving us ways to access often-needed information quickly. The second screen has a lot of useful moments for being so small, and it’s better than what other companies have tried to do with similar experiments, even if it is an ergonomic nightmare.Powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 808 chipset with Quad-core Processor and 4GB RAM, the new LG’s V10 is considered as a new flagship device set to answer other smartphone giants. It has 4 gigs of RAM and 64 gigs of storage, and there's a microSD card slot. Powering a 16.0MP main unit with laser focus, HDR and panorama mode and a front snapper with 5MP autofocus lens; the phone is set for every kind of photography. With LG V10’s QHD 5.7 Quantum IPS+ display and it runs at QHD 2560 x 1440, all of your movies will be played at their very best but if you want stream a movie online, go 4K streaming with its advanced LTE support. LG equips V10 with a massive 128GB expandable storage so that you can easily download, watch and share movies on your device without worrying about the space.                                                                              

but,The V10 shares has the same hexa-core Snapdragon 808 processor and Adreno 418 GPU as the G4. This is a bit of disappointing, because at this price it should really be packing the faster Snapdragon 810 and Adreno 430 like the Nexus 6P.The handset is pricey, its secondary display doesn't offer any essential necessities and its manual camera features require some time to learn.
THE BOTTOM LINE At 5.7 inches, with a second screen that brings it to 5.9 inches, this is a phablet that competes with the iPhone 6S Plus and Samsung Galaxy Note 5. Its price, still undetermined but more expensive than the LG G4, is going to be a big factor for many people.The feature-packed V10 is LG's best smartphone yet -- just be prepared to pay a premium for its selfie- and photo-friendly extras.                      Price:$633                                                                                                                                                VS                                                                                                                                                              Apple iPhone 6s                                                                                                                                         The iPhone 6s keeps the same design as the iPhone 6, but packs better cameras, a snappier processor and 3D Touch, a smart new way to get things done in fewer steps. Beyond that, the combination of iOS 9 and some well-built hardware help makes the 6s one of the best iPhones ever made... even if we wish it had some of the 6s Plus' niceties.                                                                                                                    Improved speed everywhere (new processor, faster wireless, quicker Touch ID sensor); a sturdier body; better front and rear cameras; a bold new 3D Touch pressure-sensitive display that could end up being a really useful tool in apps down the road, and which already offers new iOS shortcuts.                                   Performance
Providing the power behind the scenes on the iPhone 6 is a 1.39GHz dual-core A8 processor with 64-bit architecture and 1GB of RAM.
The iPhone 6 seemed to be the slicker of the two new iHandsets when it comes to chugging away under the finger, although when looking at the Geekbench 3 scores, we can see it's almost identical to the iPhone 6 Plus (average score of 2905 vs 2911 for the 6 Plus).
This puts it below 2015's crop of smartphones like the Samsung Galaxy S6 andHTC One M9, but right with the Samsung Galaxy S5 and below the One M8 and One E8 - although HTC has admitted to slightly gaming those results with a special 'high power mode'.
In short, despite the dual-core processor, Apple seems to have eked out enough power to make the iPhone 6 a strong enough contender day to day.                                                                                              Battery Life
“Battery life could be a problem,” was my first thought when I started my iPhone 6S review, and with good reason. Wonderful though 3D Touch and the Taptic Engine are, Apple had to reduce the battery capacity from 1,810mAh to 1,715mAh to fit them in. It made the 6S slightly thicker and heavier, too, though not enough that anyone should care.
The iPhone 6 didn't have a stellar reputation for battery life, and while some of those complaints are overblown, they’re not without foundation. Certainly, the ‘Plus’ variant is the phone to go for if you suffer range “range anxiety”.
Through my week using the the iPhone 6S, I consistently managed 15 to 17 hours per day. Switching off Bluetooth and disabling the Facebook app’s background refresh made a big difference, though I always left Wi-Fi on.
For whatever reason, the Facebook app uses more background time than other app. Before the change Facebook was responsible for close to 25% of the phone’s battery drain, despite being on screen for just 20 minutes or so. iOS 9’s improved battery monitoring was a godsend here.                                                       Navigation puts a big strain on the battery, though, particularly in built-up areas. One 15-minute walk with directions drained 7% from the battery. Streaming video over Wi-Fi burns through around 12% of battery per hour, depending on the quality and how bright your screen is.
The new Low Power won’t extend your life indefinitely, but it’s useful and effective enough. iOS prompts you to turn it on when your battery hits 20% and it turns off all background activity, while also throttling down the CPU and GPU.
The iPhone is already frugal when idle, but Low Power extends that further still – I once got five hours of very light use after passing 20%, which is handy if you’re staying out late. And you can turn Low Power on earlier if you know you have a long day ahead – the iPhone 6S runs fine when it’s on.                    Ultimately, while some management is needed from time to time, I never felt like I would run out before I got home, and it would only concern me if I was on a “night out” and got home late. In those cases, a few simple precautions will avert problems.
Power users who stream video all day, use navigation lots or play games often should look at the 6S Plus, but the 6S’s battery life is fine for the majority of people.

But,Same battery life as the iPhone 6. The 6S Plus model remains the only way to get optical image stabilization for photos and video, plus better battery life. You'll need to pay extra to vault past the too-small storage of the entry-level 16GB version.
THE BOTTOM LINE The newest iPhones are top-to-bottom better phones with lots of enhancements; iPhone 6 owners don't need the upgrade, but everyone else should seriously consider it.
  Key Features: 4.7-inch, 326ppi LCD; 7.1mm thick; 143g; 1.8GHz Dual-Core; 2GB RAM; 16/64/128GB storage ; 12-megapixel iSight camera; 5-megapixel Facetime HD camera
Manufacturer: Apple

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