Saturday, 2 April 2016

iPhone 6S Plus vs Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge vs HTC One M9:Who is the best?

iPhone 6S Plus                                                                                                                                             The iPhone 6S Plus is just as big, bold, and bright as last year’s phablet. Its 5.5-inch screen sports the same number of pixels as last year’s iPhone with a 1,920 × 1,080-pixel resolution and a density of 401 pixels per inch.Improved speed, better cameras, always-on Siri, and pressure-sensitive 3D Touch display compared to last year's 6 Plus. And it has slightly better battery life, a bigger higher resolution screen, and optical image stabilization for photos and video that can make a difference.  in short: the iPhone 6S Plus is very fast. In fact, it surpasses even our previous fastest phone – the Samsung Galaxy S6 – in some of the benchmark tests. While other smartphones come with four, six or even eight CPU cores, the iPhone 6S Plus manages to deliver such performance with only two. How can it perform better than those other phones that sound so impressive on paper?
It’s because many smartphone apps use only one or two cores at a time. This means that having fewer but more powerful cores is often of greater benefit than having a bag-load of cores that aren’t quite as fast.
In addition, you shouldn’t feel the iPhone 6S is shortchanging you in terms of processors. While the CPU has only two cores, the GPU (graphics processing unit) has six. With the two combined on the A9 chipset, the 6S Plus is a powerhouse – whether you’re into gaming, photo editing or general productivity.
For security, the 6S Plus comes with Touch ID – Apple’s fingerprint scanner – built into the home button.
This makes your phone far more secure than relying on a simple PIN – in fact, iOS 9 now strongly recommends you use a six-digit PIN instead of the four-digit one iPhone users will be more accustomed to.
Touch ID also lets you use the iPhone 6S Plus with Apple Pay, so you can tap your phone on a touch-and-pay terminal to purchase good and services.
Apple Pay has been around in the US for more than a year now, but was only recently introduced to the UK and so isn't yet supported by all the banks. For example, holders of a Barclays bank account can't yet use Apple Pay.
Fingerprint scanners are by no means unique to the iPhone any more, but they’re still a great feature, making it super-easy to keep your phone secure without making unlocking a regular drudgery.
Touch ID on the iPhone 6S Plus is better than ever, thanks to the improved processor. It unlocks the phone almost twice as fast as before, giving you access to all your mobile tools even more quickly.
The final iPhone 6S Plus feature worth expanding on is something we’ve mentioned already, the new Taptic Engine.
You’ll have experienced phones vibrating when on silent before and the Taptic Engine on the iPhone 6S Plus performs a similar function, but it’s as close to those as a hamburger is to a fillet steak.
It brings a more nuanced experience to the vibrations that help you better understand what’s going on. A phone call has a different feel to a text message, for example.
It also ties into 3D Touch. Use 3D Touch on an icon that supports it and a short buzz lets you know it’s been activated. Try it on one that doesn’t support 3D Touch and you get the vibration equivalent of a head shake.

but,Apple's made the iPhone 6S Plus bigger (slightly) and heavier (considerably), meaning it's still a beast to hold and very difficult to use one handed. It's really big. It costs more than the smaller iPhone. Other phablet-sized phones offer longer battery life.
THE BOTTOM LINE :A combination of excellent power and an exciting new technology in 3D Touch means the iPhone 6S Plus is set up for the future much better than the 6 Plus. The iPhone 6S Plus has a few key advantages that give it an edge for serious iPhone users, but its big body still may not fit for a lot of people.                                                                                                                                              Price:$649
                                                                                                                                                                                                   VS                                                                                                                           Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge
This is a first for an AMOLED smartphone, and dramatically boosts screen clarity when you're outdoors. Colours look punchy and I had no trouble using it in direct sunlight.The Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge's wraparound screen transforms an already great phone into Samsung's best-looking handset. Ever. The QHD display complements the sweeping, curving design by giving you something visually stunning to look at. It's not a huge step forward from the full HD panel on the Galaxy S5, but it looks great.                                   For a long time now Samsung has used Qualcomm Snapdragon processors in its flagships, at least in the West. In Asia it's been using its own-brand Exynos processors, which it's now opted to put in the Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge. And it looks like the right decision.
The Exynos is a 64-bit processor, so some 64-bit compatible apps should see a modest performance boost. More importantly, and just like the 810, it uses ARM’s big.LITTLE configuration. This allows a ‘big’ quad-core CPU (2.1GHz) to be paired with a ‘little’, low-power quad-core (1.5GHz). Smaller tasks like browsing the web and listening to music use the little quad, which uses less juice. Intensive tasks, like 3D gaming, use the big quad.
Even in power saving mode, the S6 Edge has a higher Geekbench 3 score than the HTC One M9 running at full speed. When it comes to 3DMark Ice Storm Unlimited test – a test that focuses on gaming performance – full power results are a lot closer, but even here the S6 Edge comes out on top.                                  What makes the Exynos 7420 special is that it uses a 14nm manufacturing process, like the latest Intel chips, that puts it ahead of the 20nm process used by Qualcomm on the Snapdragon 810. In layman’s terms, smaller manufacturing processes provide benefits to processing speeds and help reduce the use of battery power.
Not only is the Exynos 7420 super-fast, it also seems to run a lot cooler than the Snapdragon 810 on the HTC One M9 and LG G Flex 2. Even during a prolonged gaming session the Edge remains cool to touch, although battery drain rises significantly.
Gaming performance is top-notch with intensive games like Riptide 2 running like a dream. We didn’t experience a single dropped frame or stutter. The S6 Edge is a real powerhouse thanks to that beast of a processor. Samsung made the right move dropping Qualcomm’s effort.
but,That supercool design comes with a big price tag, and the screen doesn't deliver any real killer apps. Like the regular S6, the Edge doesn't support swappable batteries or expandable storage. The lack of expandable storage isn't a huge issue as the S6 Edge comes in 32GB, 64GB and 128GB flavors with the added bonus of 100GB of free OneDrive cloud storage - but battery life isn't up to standard. You'll struggle to see out a whole day with moderate usage, and that's a real shame. If you're a heavy user you'll be dashing for a charger mid-afternoon.
THE BOTTOM LINEThe Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge is one of those phones that sets a line in the sand for smartphones. It makes curved edges viable, offering them in a phone that doesn't look bonkers just for the sake of it. Samsung's striking, high-end Galaxy S6 Edge has the beauty, brains and brawn to take down the iPhone 6 and all the Android competition.                                                                                                     Key Features: 5.1-inch 1440 x 2560-resolution screen; Octa-core Exynos 7420 chipset; 2,550mAh non-removable battery; 3GB RAM; Wireless charging; Samsung Pay mobile payments; Android 5.0 L with TouchWiz
Manufacturer: Samsung
Price:$624
 VS                                                                                                                                                              HTC One M9                                                                                                                                                The HTC One M9 feels smaller than the M8, but not by much at all. It measures 144.6 x 69.7 x 9.61mm and weighs 157g, so it's only a minor difference between the two devices - 2mm shaved off the height, 1mm from the width, and 0.2mm added in thickness.The HTC One M9 inherits its predecessor's stunning metal design and strong speakers, and has a bright, sharp display. It runs the latest version of Android, and the new Sense 7 software is simple, responsive and highly customisable. It's one of the few flagship phones to still feature expandable storage, and it offers a unique one-year replacement program in the US.                   Performance
Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 octa-core; 3GB RAM
Qualcomm’s 800-series processors dominated 2014 flagships, and with good reason. The Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 and Sony Xperia Z3 all packed a serious wallop and made mincemeat of intense 3D games and processor-hungry HD video conversion.
The 64-bit octa-core Snapdragon 810 the One M9 totes is Qualcomm’s latest and greatest and provides twice the number of cores of the M8's 801. Twice the power, then? It doesn’t quite work that way, I’m afraid.
The Snapdragon 810 uses ARM’s big.LITTLE architecture. This let’s a low-powered 1.55GHz quad-core processor be paired with another, more powerful, 1.96GHz quad-core processor on the same chipset. The benefits of this aren’t just about increasing power – last-gen quad-core processors are already powerful – it’s about energy efficiency.                                                                                                                         Most of the common tasks your smartphone does – make calls, send texts, collect sensor data, listen to music and browse the web – don’t need much power. Using a mighty processor for these is overkill, and uses more of the battery than it should. That’s where the LITTLE quad-core comes into play. It takes care of all those smaller, daily, tasks in a more energy efficient way, thereby conserving power. It also means that HTC no longer needs the co-processor that handled all the sensor data on the M9’s predecessor.
The processor is restricted in Power Saver mode. This means that the HTC One M9 performs differently depending on how much juice you’re willing to sacrifice.
Let’s leave the benefits to the HTC One M9’s battery life to one side for a moment and focus on its performance. As you can expect the Snapdragon 810 and 3GB RAM helps the One M9 fly through common tasks like flicking through menus, opening apps and browsing the web, regardless of which quad is being used.
Battery life                                                                                                                                                 Battery life on the HTC One M9 should be brilliant in comparison to what's been before. The Snapdragon 801 chipset finally made an HTC phone decent at lasting throughout a day last year, and with a larger power pack and an improvement from Qualcomm things should be awesome.
Sadly, they're not. I'm not saying that it's a problem and this phone won't last long enough to tap out a couple of tweets, but the performance hasn't been moved on much from last year.
The issue is that the phone heats up really easily doing the most mundane of tasks. Anything that takes a little bit of wireless connection is a quick way to watch it drop, be it mobile data or listening to music over headphones.
Where most phones these days won't have much of an issue losing no more than 10% on my morning commute, even with a bit of video action, the One M9 has dropped as much as 17% through Bluetooth music streaming and emails, which is odd as this doesn't usually munch too much power.
The good news is Google's new Android 5.0 gives you a good way of checking the problems, letting you shut down (or get rid of) the apps which are misbehaving.                                                                           However, in this case it's 'Google Services' which is the issue, elements fundamental to the running of the phone, which means there's not a lot to be done about it.
I usually see this in the first few days of reviewing, but the issue has pervaded. Hardcore testing - be it standby, heavy apps, web browsing and YouTube videos, for instance - has proven the HTC to be a poorer choice than the rest of the competition, with poorer background battery management.
This means you can't lean on the One M9 too heavily for playing games or watching videos, which is irritating if you want to have a little bit of battery left at the end of the day.
Gaming is really heavy on the battery, with a quick 15 minute game sometimes sucking 10% juice - although the issue is often that mobile games these days are constantly communicating with servers for online play or in app purchases, which hurts the battery.
Running TechRadar's standard battery test on the One M9, where we looped a 90 min full HD video at maximum brightness showed that the new HTC phone was one of the worst performers of recent times, with 31% of the battery disappearing.
If you consider that the LG G Flex 2, another big phone on the market with the Snapdragon 810 chipset, only lost 13% in the same test, then you'll see that there's something going on with the software here.
I also ran the same test on the newly-Lollipopped HTC One M8 and HTC One M7, and they managed 24% and 30% respectively - and the phone from 2013 had barely enough battery to make it through the day too. This shows that for some reason HTC has managed to go backwards in battery life, even with the larger capacity and theoretically more efficient processor.
I'm confident battery life will improve, but it's actually a small step back from the One M8, which can be had for nearly half the price of the new version, and that's just not good enough.                                                                                                                                                                                                                       The other big thing here is QuickCharge 2.0 – although this offers a pretty amazing 60% charge in just 30 mins, the charger in the box isn't QuickCharge enabled to get the maximum speeds on offer.
This is just ludicrous – I thought by this point that they'd be standard as the tech began appearing in phones last year. It's really frustrating that you'll need to spend so much more given this is an already expensive phone.
But, The M9's camera quality and battery life don't measure up to its competitors. For better or worse, the phone feels like a rerun of last year's HTC One.
THE BOTTOM LINE The updated HTC One M9 packs speed and software improvements into a handset that remains lustworthy in middle age, but it doesn't exceed the competition where it counts.
Key Features: 20-megapixel rear camera ; 4-megapixel Ultrapixel front-facing camera; 5-inch 1080p LCD screen; BoomSound speakers with Dolby Surround; Qualcomm Snapdragon 810, 3GB RAM; 32GB onboard storage with microSD slot; HTC Sense 7 on Android 5.0 Lollipop
Manufacturer: HTC

No comments:

Post a Comment