Friday, 29 January 2016

Apple iPhone 6s vs OnePlus 2 vs Samsung GalaxyS6:Hot cake is.........................

Apple iPhone 6s                                                                                                                                           The iPhone 6s keeps the same design as the iPhone 6, but packs better cameras, a snappier processor and 3D Touch, a smart new way to get things done in fewer steps. Beyond that, the combination of iOS 9 and some well-built hardware help makes the 6s one of the best iPhones ever made... even if we wish it had some of the 6s Plus' niceties.Improved speed everywhere (new processor, faster wireless, quicker Touch ID sensor); a sturdier body; better front and rear cameras; a bold new 3D Touch pressure-sensitive display that could end up being a really useful tool in apps down the road, and which already offers new iOS shortcuts.    Performance
Providing the power behind the scenes on the iPhone 6 is a 1.39GHz dual-core A8 processor with 64-bit architecture and 1GB of RAM.
The iPhone 6 seemed to be the slicker of the two new iHandsets when it comes to chugging away under the finger, although when looking at the Geekbench 3 scores, we can see it's almost identical to the iPhone 6 Plus (average score of 2905 vs 2911 for the 6 Plus).
This puts it below 2015's crop of smartphones like the Samsung Galaxy S6 andHTC One M9, but right with the Samsung Galaxy S5 and below the One M8 and One E8 - although HTC has admitted to slightly gaming those results with a special 'high power mode'.
In short, despite the dual-core processor, Apple seems to have eked out enough power to make the iPhone 6 a strong enough contender day to day.                                                                                            Battery Life
“Battery life could be a problem,” was my first thought when I started my iPhone 6S review, and with good reason. Wonderful though 3D Touch and the Taptic Engine are, Apple had to reduce the battery capacity from 1,810mAh to 1,715mAh to fit them in. It made the 6S slightly thicker and heavier, too, though not enough that anyone should care.
The iPhone 6 didn't have a stellar reputation for battery life, and while some of those complaints are overblown, they’re not without foundation. Certainly, the ‘Plus’ variant is the phone to go for if you suffer range “range anxiety”.
Through my week using the the iPhone 6S, I consistently managed 15 to 17 hours per day. Switching off Bluetooth and disabling the Facebook app’s background refresh made a big difference, though I always left Wi-Fi on.
For whatever reason, the Facebook app uses more background time than other app. Before the change Facebook was responsible for close to 25% of the phone’s battery drain, despite being on screen for just 20 minutes or so. iOS 9’s improved battery monitoring was a godsend here.                                                       Navigation puts a big strain on the battery, though, particularly in built-up areas. One 15-minute walk with directions drained 7% from the battery. Streaming video over Wi-Fi burns through around 12% of battery per hour, depending on the quality and how bright your screen is.
The new Low Power won’t extend your life indefinitely, but it’s useful and effective enough. iOS prompts you to turn it on when your battery hits 20% and it turns off all background activity, while also throttling down the CPU and GPU.
The iPhone is already frugal when idle, but Low Power extends that further still – I once got five hours of very light use after passing 20%, which is handy if you’re staying out late. And you can turn Low Power on earlier if you know you have a long day ahead – the iPhone 6S runs fine when it’s on.                   Ultimately, while some management is needed from time to time, I never felt like I would run out before I got home, and it would only concern me if I was on a “night out” and got home late. In those cases, a few simple precautions will avert problems.
Power users who stream video all day, use navigation lots or play games often should look at the 6S Plus, but the 6S’s battery life is fine for the majority of people.
But,Same battery life as the iPhone 6. The 6S Plus model remains the only way to get optical image stabilization for photos and video, plus better battery life. You'll need to pay extra to vault past the too-small storage of the entry-level 16GB version.
THE BOTTOM LINE The newest iPhones are top-to-bottom better phones with lots of enhancements; iPhone 6 owners don't need the upgrade, but everyone else should seriously consider it.
  Key Features: 4.7-inch, 326ppi LCD; 7.1mm thick; 143g; 1.8GHz Dual-Core; 2GB RAM; 16/64/128GB storage ; 12-megapixel iSight camera; 5-megapixel Facetime HD camera
Manufacturer: Apple                                                                                                                                VS
 OnePlus 2                                                                                                                                               One Plus two changes the old tradition and comes in removable metal frame. The magnesium alloy body and stainless steel buttons give premium look to the smartphone.The OnePlus 2 offers high-end performance at a low price, while not skimping on design. The rear camera delivers pretty good pictures as well. The OnePlus 2 has a couple of new features which were not there in OnePlus One. First one is a fingerprint sensor. Just like the other flagships like Samsung Galaxy S6 and iPhone 6, the fingerprint sensor is located in the home button.
Another new feature is USB Type-C, meaning the same slot acts as USB port and same is used to connect he charger.
  The phone comes with a 5.50-inch touchscreen display with a resolution of 1080 pixels by 1920 pixels which is covered up under a defensive Corning Gorilla Glass 4, likely the best sort as far as Corning gorilla glass, the most delightful and most tough. The OnePlus 2 is powered by 1.8GHz octa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 processor  which is compacted enough that it can undoubtedly gives most extreme joy amid operation in a mixed bag of modes and pleasant looking realistic graphic engine and it comes with 4GB of RAM. The phone packs 64GB of internal storage cannot be expanded. As far as the cameras are concerned, the OnePlus 2 packs a 13-megapixel primary camera on the rear and a 5-megapixel front shooter for selfies. what most attractive aspect of the device is a dual LED flash light that makes it more decisive product. Video making would be opted for you to achieve ever best 2160p@30fps, 2160p(DCI)@24fps, 1080p@60fps, 720p@120fps results along with HDR and stereo sound recording also.  The OnePlus 2 runs OxygenOS 2.0 and is powered by a 3300mAh non removable battery. It measures 151.80 x 74.90 x 9.85 (height x width x thickness) and weighs 175.00 grams. The OnePlus 2 is a dual SIM (GSM and GSM) smartphone that accepts two Nano-SIM. Connectivity options include Wi-Fi, GPS, Bluetooth, 3G, 4G (with support for Band 40 used by some LTE networks). Sensors on the phone include Proximity sensor, Ambient light sensor, Accelerometer, and Gyroscope. Oneplus 2 is a handset specifically for those who enjoy playing ultimate 3D games and watching Blue ray videos, besides you may find under the hood remarkable two versions of internal storage (16GB and 64GB respectively) and what trash we find is the non availability of expendable card slot. The battery power in One Plus Two is also increased and the handset has non-removable 3300mAh battery which provides 30:29 hours talk-time, 8:05 hours web browsing and 8:28 hours on video playback. The battery consumes 150 minutes to charge completely.
But,There are a number of frustrating software issues with the OnePlus 2, including a sketchy fingerprint scanner and home button, slow dialer and confused messaging streams which take the shine off what is another strong contender from the Chinese firm.The phone lacks both fast and wireless charging and the USB Type-C port doesn't offer any performance benefits. Some software bugs hamper the user experience.
THE BOTTOM LINE The inclusion of a fingerprint scanner is a nice touch, adding to the premium persona the OnePlus 2 is trying to exude, while the beefed-up camera has a few neat tricks. The OnePlus 2 offers powerful hardware and beautiful design at a comparatively low price, but availability through the OnePlus invite system makes it hard to acquire.                                                                                                          Price:$390
                                                                                                                                                                    VS                                                                                                                                                     Samsung GalaxyS6's                                                                                                                                     The new super-skinny build does mean that this Samsung gets very warm in use, however. Actually, not warm, it gets plain hot. Finger-burning hot. This is something that's becoming more and more common with today's increasingly thin smartphones, particularly those that have metal bodies. But I'm pleased to report that even when it's got a fever on performance doesn't appear to be affected.                                                                                                                                                                                                                     The upscale Samsung Galaxy S6's smooth glass-and-matte-metal body, improved fingerprint reader, and convenient new camera shortcut key make the phone a stunner. Samsung's decluttered take on Android 5.0 brings the beauty inside, too.
But,Longtime fans will bristle at the Galaxy S6's nonremovable battery and absent expandable storage. The phone has an intensely reflective backing and looks embarrassingly like the iPhone 6. Battery life, while good, falls short of last year's Galaxy.
THE BOTTOM LINE Worldly looks and top-notch specs make the impressive, metal Samsung Galaxy S6 the Android phone to beat for 2015.
 Performance
Octa-core Exynos 7420 big.LITTLE Processor; Mali T760 GPU; 3GB RAM
The Galaxy S6 runs Android 5.0 Lollipop integrated with a newly streamlined version of TouchWiz and it’s incredibly snappy to use. One of the best features is the multi-window functionality – I used it frequently.
 Multi-window lets you open and use two apps simultaneously by holding down the option button or dragging from the top left corner of the screen. It’s great for writing an email while checking details online, or sharing posts from social media while talking about them with a friend on WhatsApp, for example.
Overall, the streamlined look and feel of the TouchWiz is a winner. We did experience a couple of instances where downloaded and native applications would randomly stop working, but we imagine this will be smoothed out fairly easily with updates.
TouchWiz gets a huge helping hand by the fact this is the most powerful smartphone on the market right now. Only the HTC One M9, with its Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 processor, gets close to matching its performance.
 The credit goes to the 64-bit Samsung Exynos 7420 octa-core processor and 3GB RAM – it’s the first time Samsung has used this chip in a phone. It seems that switching away from Qualcomm’s top-end Snapdragon processor in its flagship phone has paid off handsomely.
The Exynos 7420 processor has an advantage over the powerful Snapdragon 810 processor used by the HTC One M9 because the chip is smaller and more energy efficient. You can read the software and performance sections of our Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge review for a more detailed breakdown of how it compares to the competition, but needless to say the S6 impresses.
One of the best demonstrations of the Galaxy S6’s power is how smoothly it handles graphically intensive games like Real Racing 3 or Asphalt 8. There are no dropped frames whatsoever and the games are rendered better than we’ve seen on any other phone.                                                                         Battery life
 Battery life on the Samsung Galaxy S6. Now we get to the real issue of this phone. It's not good enough, and that's hugely frustrating.
Let me put this into context: it's as good as the HTC One M9 and iPhone 6 in terms of being able to last just about through the day. Given that last year we were seeing phones that could easily make it to bed time without running out of juice, it's maddening that Samsung, like others, has gone backwards here.
The reason is simple: the battery pack in the new S6 is smaller than last year, 2550mAh compared to 2800mAh. The reduction is there solely so Samsung could make a slimmer phone, focusing on design over functionality. And unlike previous years, the battery can no longer be removed, taking away one of the big things fans loved about the phones.                                                                                                             Key Features: 5.1-inch 1440 x 2560 resolution screen; Octa-core Exynos 7420 chipset; Wireless Charging; 3GB RAM; 2,550mAh non-removable battery; Android 5.0 L with TouchWiz; Samsung Pay; IR Blaster
Manufacturer: Samsung

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